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A Streamlined and More Generous Garden Harvest Supply

October 20th, 2016

butterfly-on-echinacea-plantsFor many years we have not only been selling you plants, but everything that has to do with plants—from fertilizer to tools to fencing, right down to birdbaths and books.

Recently we did some thinking about our mission and vision, and reflected on what we like to do the most (and what we are best at.)

We came to the conclusion that the thing we like to do the most is grow and sell plants. Not surprisingly, that is also what we are best at. We have therefore decided to zero-in on both our strength and our passion, and focus our business on the growing and selling of plants.

We also realized that simply turning a profit is not enough for us: we want Garden Harvest Supply to make a difference in the world.

Although growing and selling plants is certainly a positive livelihood, we decided to take it a step further and form ties with organizations that are teaching people in need how to grow their own food. We will soon be revealing the details of this community service component of the newly streamlined and restructured GHS.

We’ve been featuring a lot of 50% off sales in order to clear out our non-plant inventory. These will continue until we are left with just plants. If you need organic seeds, growing supplies, high quality tools, books, or any other items in our inventory, stay tuned…because we will continue to offer exceptional discounts while supplies last.

And stay tuned for news about our upcoming charitable program. Not only will we be growing and shipping the very best potted plants, but together with our customers—you!—we will be making a difference in people’s lives through helping the needy to be self-sufficient by growing their own gardens.

We appreciate your business and look forward to continuing to serve you in the future.

Joe Stutzman and Everyone at GHS!

Vegetable Planting Guides for all 50 States

September 1st, 2016

Vegetable planting guides for all 50 statesGrowing your own vegetables isn’t hard. The first step is to determine the location; most started in areas that receive at least 8 hours of sunlight per day. Next you’ll want to make sure you have a handy source for water. Then comes the fun part, determining what vegetables you want to grow. Part of this process is knowing how much space they will need, how long they will be growing, and the best time of the year to get them started.

Depending on where you live, vegetables can be grown at different times. Some areas of the country only have one season, while others have multiple seasons. Knowing the proper planting time will help maximize your growing space and ensure a rewarding experience.

We have vegetable planting guides for all 50 states. To get started, click on the state you will be gardening in.

Alabama | Alaska | Arizona | Arkansas | California (Northern) | California (Southern) | Colorado | Connecticut | Delaware | Florida | Georgia | Hawaii | Idaho | Illinois | Indiana | Iowa | Kansas | Kentucky | Louisiana | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | Minnesota | Mississippi | Missouri | Montana | Nebraska | Nevada | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New Mexico | New York | North Carolina | North Dakota | Ohio | Oklahoma | Oregon | Pennsylvania | Rhode Island | South Carolina | South Dakota | Tennessee | Texas | Utah | Vermont | Virginia | Washington | West Virginia | Wisconsin | Wyoming | District of Columbia

Save Your Bird Feeders By Feeding The Squirrels

January 4th, 2016

This May Sound Corny

Squirrel dining on an ear of cornSquirrels are active critters, and they're fascinating to watch. Just like birds, squirrels stay warm and protected in nests they have built in hollow tree trunks or in the limbs and branches of tall trees. Sometimes, the elements destroy their nests, so they have to rebuild and they leave their old homes behind.

Squirrels bury food but they don't find it again from memory. They have a great sense of smell and find food buried by other animals. Squirrels love to chew, and they will chew on nearly anything within their access, to keep their teeth sharp. They also have extremely sharp toenails that can shred skin, so don't ever try to pick up a squirrel, even if he's friendly. Squirrels are wildlife and make terrible pets, but if you keep a supply of food available, they'll make your yard their regular dining spot.

During inclement weather, squirrels have a nice fur coat to keep them warm, but if their food sources are buried under blankets of snow or layers of ice, they can get pretty frustrated. Even the nuts and seeds they've stored for the winter can become inaccessible in heavy snows. So, in cold months, your birdfeeders are more appealing to squirrels than ever.

Squirrels love corn and they will often leave bird feeders alone (even the black oil sunflower seeds) when offered corn feed in one form or another. Our squirrel feeders are made to hold cob corn or corn kernels and can be elaborate and tricky to perch on, or simple.

Our most economical corn feeder, the Chain Squirrel Feeder, holds an ear of corn off the ground, suspended from a branch or a roof eave.  The chain feeder provides food and quite a bit of fun as the squirrels leap to the corncob and hang on for dear life as they munch.

If you prefer to make squirrels really work for their dinner, install our Squirrel Spinner or Squirrel-Go-Round. And for the most challenging of all, put up a Squngee bungee feeder. These feeders will provide the most entertainment for your money, delivering hours of giggles as you watch the squirrels perform acrobatics to earn their meals. No one said you had to make it easy for them. Feed the squirrels: laughter is good for your health!

Squirrels are extremely active and stay on the go all day, which means they need a constant food source. Primarily vegetarians, their diet consists fruits, buds, seeds, nuts, roots, pinecones, leaves, twigs and bark. Many types of squirrel feeders and squirrel food are available commercially, to keep squirrels happy and coming back to your yard for their dinners.

Bon Appetit!

Which type of onion should I plant?

October 13th, 2015


Thinking about growing onions but not sure which variety to choose?

There are three types of onions grown for bulbs. They are short-day, intermediate-day, and long-day onions.

The type gives us an idea on the amount of daylight needed for the onion to start producing its bulb.

Short-day varieties start producing their bulbs when they receive between 10 and 12 hours of daylight. Intermediate-day varieties need between 12 and 14 hours of daylight. And long-day varieties need between 14 and 16 hours of daylight to start growing their bulbs.

So how does one figure out the amount of daylight they receive?

We’ll make it simple!

We know our days are either getting longer or shorter, depending on what part of the year we are in. In the northern hemisphere the days start getting longer around the 21st of December. Each day thereafter receives more daylight until around June 21, which is the longest day of the year. Because the northern hemisphere is tilting towards the sun during the winter months, the furthest northern states actually receive more daylight than southern states.

Best states for growing short day onions

Because the states to the south receive the fewest hours of daylight during the growing season, they should plant short-day varieties. If they try growing a long-day instead, it would never produce a bulb because it won’t receive the necessary hours of daylight to “switch on” its bulb production.

Best states for growing long day onions

Because they receive the most daylight during the growing season, northern states should plant long-day varieties. If they try growing a short-day variety, it would receive too much daylight before its leaf growth had finished, resulting in a very small bulb.

Best states for growing intermediate day onions

The states in between should grow the intermediate-day varieties. Depending on which mid-states, some short- or long-day varieties might grow well, too.

For complete onion growing instructions, read; How to Grow the Most Flavorful Onions

How To Grow Cucumbers

September 21st, 2015

Growing cucumbers from a trellis nettingCucumbers are a low-maintenance, high-yielding, low-calorie, nutrient-rich and scrumptious vegetable. Widely popular with home gardeners, cucumbers are one of the easiest vegetables to grow, with an assortment of selections adaptable to any gardeners space limitations.

Cucumbers When to Plant

Cucumbers are a warm-weather crop that, once established, should produce well into the fall. When putting out transplants, wait one to two weeks after your last frost date; seeds can be sown directly into the garden on your last spring frost date. You can find your average last frost date here.

Cucumbers Where and What Variety to Grow

To successfully grow cucumbers, you should choose a spot that gets at least 8 hours of sunlight daily and is easily accessible for watering. Once you’ve found the ideal location, space and personal preference will be the next factors to take into consideration. There are lots of cucumber varieties on the market:

  • Dwarf Cucumber Plants such as our Bush Crop Cucumber Plant, are the perfect cucumbers for container gardens or for very small garden areas. This is also a popular choice for schoolyard gardens. Their growth is more upright than vining, and they do not require a lot of space.
  • Semi-Dwarf Cucumber Plants such as our Fanfare Cucumber Plant, are also adaptable to container growing and will only take up a bit more space in your garden than a dwarf variety. They grow a little taller than vigorous varieties, but with vines about half the length.
  • Vigorous Cucumber Plants sometimes referred to as vining cucumber plants, will require the most room in the garden. Some vigorous varieties grow on vines reaching up to 6 feet (or sometimes longer) in length. The fruits are most often 8 to 12 inches long and will grow best upon trellises. Our most popular vigorous variety is the Garden Sweet Burpless Cucumber Plant.

Cucumbers How to Fertilize and Water

Cucumbers will grow best with adequate nutrition. Cucumber plants should be fertilized, preferably with an organic fertilizer, when first transplanted, again about a week after blooming, and then every 3 to 4 weeks afterwards. Use a low nitrogen fertilizer in order to avoid leggy, leafy, beautiful, but potentially fruitless vines.

Cucumbers also require consistent watering; inconsistent or negligent watering can result in bitter fruit. Water thoroughly two to three times a week, depending upon the climatic conditions in your area. Container plantings should be monitored closely and never allowed to completely dry out. Bear in mind that watering around the roots, as opposed to on the leaves, will provide the most efficient hydration to your vegetable plants and will help to prevent foliar diseases, mildew and leaf scorch.

Harvesting cucumbers from the gardenCucumbers When to Harvest

When choosing a variety, be sure to know the estimated number of days to maturity. Remember, this is just a guideline; Mother Nature may have her own agenda. Climatic conditions, soil health, moisture and disease can greatly affect your cucumber harvest in terms of time and yield. And, since cucumbers produce throughout the entire season, it is virtually impossible to gauge the number of days any specific cucumber has been on the vine.

Cucumbers at their peak will more easily separate from the vine when you harvest. If you really have to aggressively tug or cut the vine, you may want to wait a day or two. Its a good idea to wear gloves when picking cukes, as their skins and stems are covered with prickly spines that can usually be removed easily by simply wiping with a glove or cloth. Make sure the skins are smooth before serving!

Delaying harvest until a cucumber starts to turn yellow can result in bitter fruit. Though your cucumber variety may generally produce 8- to 10-inch fruits, there are always exceptions, so don’t go by size, but rather by appearance. Pick cukes just as soon as they ripen to encourage the plants to keep producing fruit. Store them in the fridge for one to two weeks, or prepare vinegar-based cucumber salads that will keep for up to a week when refrigerated. Canned pickles keep for weeks or months. The skin contains valuable dietary fiber and nutrients, plus it adds a lot of crunch, so leave the skin intact when eating raw or using in recipes for the most dietary benefits.

Cucumbers Companion Plants

All plants do not grow well together. For instance, cucumbers should be planted well away from tomatoes, sage and other aromatic herbs, such as lavender, mint or lemon grass.

On the other hand, vegetables such as radishes, beets and dill are good choices for planting in close proximity to your cucumber plants. Not only do they benefit your cucumbers when it comes to utilizing and providing needed nutrients, many of them will also help deter the most common cucumber pests, such as aphids, cucumber beetles, spider mites and pickle worms. Dill, for instance, will attract lacewings, which in turn will decimate an aphid population in short order. Lacewings will also eat the eggs of the cucumber beetle.

Growing cucumbers with marigold flowersMany flowers, such as nasturtiums and marigolds, are an effective form of pest control, naturally reducing the need to utilize chemical pesticides in your vegetable garden while adding an attractive border or colorful accent. Experts recommend planting the most pungent marigold varieties, such as French or Mexican marigolds.

The healthiest and most pest-free gardens will grow in a naturally beneficial environment. To learn more, you can read our article on Natural Pest Control.

Got photos? We’d love to see them!

How To Make Your Yard An American Goldfinch Haven

November 19th, 2014

American goldfinch on a purple coneflower


The brilliant color and sing-songy voice of the American goldfinch makes it one of the most desirable backyard birds. However, the elusiveness of these wild canaries makes them a bit of a challenge to attract. Providing the basic needs of food, shelter, and water is essential in making a goldfinch haven.

The ideal goldfinch habitat is, of course, a natural one. The more attractive the habitat, the more likely you are to have frequent visitors and nesting pairs. Because goldfinches feast almost exclusively on seeds, back yards filled with their favorite seed-producing plants will invite their colorful splashes of yellow all year long.


American goldfinches eating sunflower seedsSome of the favorite flowering plants of the American goldfinch:

Planting a variety will ensure blossoms and the resulting seeds from spring through the winter, in some climates.

An American Goldfinch sitting on a tree branchIt is also beneficial to have trees and shrubs in your yard to attract goldfinches. These not only supplement the American goldfinch diet, but they will provide safe nesting areas. Here are a few favorites, though many native trees or shrubs also attract goldfinches:

  • Arborvitaeoffers exceptional shelter within the protective evergreen foliage and yields small seed-bearing cones
  • Barberryis not only appreciated by the Goldfinch, but has stunning fall coloration
  • Boxwoodhas a neat appearance with little maintenance and is evergreen for year-round shelter
  • Elderberrythey bloom from late spring to early fall, depending upon the cultivar

Hanging baskets filled with nesting materials, such as wool or cotton, will encourage nesting pairs to stay. Keep in mind American goldfinches nest later than most other songbirds: it's best to leave the nesting material up until late summer. American goldfinch sitting on a snow covered birdbathBackyard feeders are an acceptable alternative for goldfinches if a natural habitat is not an option (or as a supplement if food is in short supply). Thistle seed, a.k.a. Nyjer seed, and black oil sunflower seed, are their favorites. They won't eat old seed, so make sure it's not in the feeder for more than 3 weeks at a time. Patience is the key here, as it can sometimes take weeks or months for the birds to discover a new café. Goldfinches are somewhat picky about what they eat; they are not picky about where they eat. They will gladly pick up the fallen seed on the ground or will dine out of a fly-thru or dish-type feeder.

Most importantly, don't forget to keep fresh water available for both drinking and bathing. A clean goldfinch is a happier goldfinch and though they get a lot of moisture from the seeds they eat, a dependable source of water is a must. Birdbaths with fountains or drippers with their splashing sounds are the most attractive. For those in climates that reach freezing temperatures, heated bird baths should be considered. There is definitely nothing wrong with pampering these little ones a bitand they are so worth it.

Now sit back and enjoy your beauties!

Overwintering Annual Plants Indoors

November 3rd, 2014

Potted_Verbena_PlantThere are many reasons to want to overwinter annuals indoors. You may have grown some new plants that you want to preserve for next season, or you may want the challenge and the sense of pride that comes with being able to say, I did it! Some gardeners simply want to save money, while many more just can’t stand to be without plants for the entire fall and winter, therefore moving as much of the garden indoors as possible.

The plants that adapt best to indoor container life are tender perennials, which are the perennial plants that won’t survive the winter in your climate Zone; therefore you typically grow them as an annual. These plants include, but are not limited to: Coleus, Cuphea, Delosperma, French Lavender, Gaura, Geraniums, Geum, Hardy Hibiscus, Heliotrope, Herbs, Impatiens, Monarda, Salvia, Sedum, Sempervivum, Swedish Ivy, True Geranium and Verbena. The fun is in the trying, so even if you’re unsure, you have nothing to lose by experimenting.

What will your outdoor plants require to survive inside?

They’ll need sunlight and moisture, just like they do outside. The problem most gardeners face is not enough sunny windows. Southern facing windows are ideal, though many gardeners rely upon grow lights to provide the necessary hours of artificial sunlight. Moisture is also critical. Winter air is very dry to begin with and heated winter air is the worst. Most plants will not tolerate such low moisture levels, even if you have a whole-house humidifier, though a room-sized humidifier and a regularly closed door may do the trick. Most experts will recommend using clean gravel with water in shallow containers under the plants. The gravel allows the plant to sit above the water, keeping the roots from being constantly too wet, while its evaporation provides the necessary humidity. Some gardeners simply mist the leaves a couple of times a week, while others house their overwintering plants in small, interior greenhouses.

The first step:
Start with clean pots. Take inventory of how many plants and the pot sizes you may need. If you are purchasing new pots, plastic ones will need no more than a quick rinse. If using terra cotta pots, soaking them in a container of water for about 10 minutes before planting will keep the pot from wicking the moisture immediately from transplants, ensuring the soil does not get overly dry during that first critical day.

Used pots, whether you’re using your own, ones you’ve purchased at yard sales or pots you’ve been given, will usually have salt deposits and old, possibly contaminated soil. Use a stiff brush, old toothbrush or butter knife to remove as much as you can and then soak the pots in a large container filled with 1 part unscented household bleach to 9 parts water. Be sure the pots are entirely submerged and let soak for 10 minutes. This will kill any diseases that may be lurking. Plastic pots can then be rinsed with clear water and air dried. Terra cotta pots should be re-submerged in a container of clear, clean water for another 10 minutes to remove the bleach from the pores of the clay, and then air dried. Performing this task each spring as you move the plants back outside will prevent cross contamination and make the fall transplant easier.

Plants or cuttings?
Indoor_Coleus_PlantYou have your choice of digging plants out of the garden to overwinter indoors, or taking cuttings of existing plants. Rooting the cuttings from late-season or frost-damaged plants is most likely an exercise in futility. Planning ahead, taking your cuttings from healthy and vigorously growing plants in midsummer, will provide the best opportunity for success. Avoid attempting to transplant or root cuttings from any plant that has symptoms of disease or pests. If you just have to have that plant for next season, quarantine it well away from any others until you are sure the problem is resolved.

Also, avoid taking cuttings that are actively blooming. If you must, pinch the blossom or bud as you take the cutting. Use a clean, sharp pair of scissors or knife, cleaning it between each cutting with soapy water or rubbing alcohol. This prevents spreading any possible disease from one plant to another. Take cuttings of three to five inches and remove any leaves from the lower half of the cutting, inserting the bottom third of the stem into a pot of fresh, very moist potting soil. Make a mini-greenhouse by placing a plastic bag over each pot, supporting it with stakes, twigs or skewers to keep the plastic from coming in contact with the plant. Place the pots in a bright place, but not in direct sunlight, as this can cook your cuttings. Some gardeners use rooting hormone when taking cuttings, but it is not a necessity. In three to four weeks the cuttings will have rooted; you can remove the plastic bag and move your pots to a sunny window.

If transplanting whole plants, you must accomplish this before frost has damaged any of the foliage. Choose only the healthiest and inspect them carefully for signs of mold, mildew, a virus or damage from pests. Use a sharp trowel or shovel to dig around and under the roots, loosening the soil and removing a good portion of the roots along with the soil. Gently shake off most of the excess soil and place in a pot with fresh potting soil, watering them well. A small amount of water should come out of the drain hole, after which the drain tray should be emptied.

Since you will be moving your plants into a lower light environment, it is best to acclimate them first. Move them to a shadier outdoor spot for a couple of weeks and watch for signs of stress. If frost is expected, cover the plants to protect them, or move them into the garage or another protected area overnight during this time of acclimation. Once acclimated, it is best to prune your plants before bringing them indoors. Most plants can be cut back by half without threatening the health of the plant. Again, you will want to use clean shears or a sharp knife, cleaning the utensils after cutting each plant. Inspect them one last time for debris and dead or dying foliage, removing these before bringing them inside. Visible bugs should be removed and the plant thoroughly soaked with a mixture of one tablespoon of all-natural soap to one quart of water.

Food and water

Indoor_Annual_PlantsMost plants being overwintered will not require regular feeding. If so inclined, feed them right after you’ve acclimated them and before bringing them in. Vigorously growing plants can be fed lightly once a month or so, if necessary. Your plants also may not need as much water as they did outdoors. Only water when the top inch of the soil is dry and then water until a small amount exits the drainage hole, letting the top dry again before watering. Never let your pots sit in excess water; most plants do not thrive well with wet feet. In fact, indoor plants are killed from overwatering more than any other type of neglect or tender loving care.

As spring arrives

As the days grow longer again, your overwintered annuals will most likely start putting out fresh growth. This is the time to feed lightly with a water-soluble plant food and to prune back any long and leggy stems that have been reaching for the sun. Monitor water requirements more carefully now as new growth means thirstier plants. Lightly pinching the first signs of new growth will encourage more branching and a more beautiful plant.

You will want to re-acclimate your plants over the next couple of weeks, after the last frost date for the season. Put them out during the day, gradually moving them from a shady spot to where they will reside for the season over a period of two to three weeks. Bring them in at night in the beginning, slowly leaving them out for longer periods as the sun goes down until they are acclimated to the nighttime temperatures. Once the soil temperature reaches 50°F and the nighttime temps are regularly 50 or above, it should be safe to put them back in the ground. Simply loosen the soil and transplant, soil and all, into a hole that is about twice the size of the pot and at the same depth. Backfill the planting hole with garden soil, water well, and mulch to discourage weed growth and to retain moisture.

Above all else, enjoy! Every plant may not survive, but the fun is in the trying. Learn from both your failures and your successes, and share what you learn with us, on our Facebook page, or with your family and friends. Gardening and plant care are an enjoyable way to connect with people from all walks of life.


How to Winterize Your Garden and Prep It for Spring

October 21st, 2014

Fall_Tree_PlantingTo Plant or Not to Plant

While winterizing your garden (well in advance of winter), you may want to consider planting perennials, shrubs and trees. If you have at least four weeks to the first frost date in your area, the moderate temperatures and adequate moisture of fall make it the ideal time to prepare a more beautiful landscape for the spring. Note: Trees with burlap root balls need to be in the ground six to eight weeks before the first frost date. Even potted perennials and shrubs can be planted now, but remember the additional requirements for closer moisture monitoring.

Throw Out the Old

We think one of the most depressing jobs is cleaning out the ‘dead’ garden; and yet we grumble even more loudly when we have to clean up the mess in the spring. Once the vegetable plants have quit producing, you can pull them up. You can do this while they are still green or wait until they turn brown, both of which are ideal for starting or adding to your compost bin or pile. Do NOT compost anything that you suspect is diseased. For example, if you had tomato blight, pull those plants out by the roots and burn or dispose of them elsewhere. In fact, it is best to pull out all of the plants by the roots, including the weeds. Leaving the roots in the soil provides ideal overwintering shelter for bugs that will plague your garden in the spring. Leaving possibly diseased plants almost ensures the same result for next season. The same is true of your annual beds. It is so nice to start with a clean slate for next year!

Tidy It Up

After the first frost, cut your perennials back according to what is recommended for the type of plant you have. In almost all cases, cutting them back to about two inches above the soil level and removing the debris will assure you have a healthier plant next spring. If you live in an area that doesn’t get a lot of snow but is liable to have exceptionally frigid winds with little moisture, mulch your perennials, shrubs and newly planted trees well. This will insulate the roots and maintain moisture throughout the winter. (This goes for strawberries, too; mulching prevents ‘heaving,’ which occurs as the soil warms and freezes over and over.) Avoid pruning new shrubs or trees the first year; this can overly stress them, making them more susceptible to winter kill.

fall_garden_cleanupPlan Ahead

Waiting until the weather forecast calls for extreme weather will likely mean you’ll be rushing around trying to find stuff with which to protect your plants (along with everyone else in your area). Stocking up ahead of time means you’ll always be prepared for the worst. These items don’t take up a whole lot of room but are priceless in case of the next blizzard of the century. Here are just a few things you should always have on hand:

  • Plant covers
  • Old sheets
  • Plastic sheeting
  • Mulch
  • Old newspapers
  • Plant ties
  • Plastic milk jugs (They’ll stack in the off season, with the bottoms cut off. Use like a cloche.)
  • Straw or hay bales

What you stock up on will depend upon what plants you landscape with. Take inventory and think ahead about what you may want to use to protect your plants. It is much less expensive to protect them than it is to replace them, especially if they are well-established and of substantial size.

Other Chores to Save Time & Money

Clean and store your garden tools: wash them, dry them well, and oil them. Rusted tools are dull, less efficient and even dangerous to use. Take the time to wash the entire tool, including the handles. Air dry if possible, even after hand drying. Then, use your favorite oil to preserve their finish through the winter. Some gardeners use a mixture of mineral oil and sand in a large bucket to store their tools, while simply spraying with WD-40 or any kind of light machine oil will also work. Store your tools where it is dry. If you notice your tools are too far gone to last another season, consider shopping for new garden tools now.

Disconnect, empty and store hoses: do this before the first hard frost, making sure to drain the hose entirely and then roll it loosely and hang or store it in a protected area. Note: if the hose is still connected and has frozen water in it, do not make the mistake of turning it on to ‘push’ the ice out. The likely result will be the water not having anywhere to go but back into your house by way of the stressed, and now broken, pipe. A good, inexpensive investment is to purchase faucet covers for your outdoor spigots.

Turn your compost one last time: Compost will continue to decompose over the winter, though much more slowly. Turn your compost pile one last time and add moisture if it is dry. If it is not covered, it will benefit you to cover it with dark plastic during this time. This will help it retain heat through the cold months, so it will decompose faster, and it will also help to jump-start the process in the spring. Your compost pile is the perfect place to put organic lawn and garden debris.

Fall garden clean-up and planting is an excellent family activity. At the end of the day, serve hot apple cider or chocolate with marshmallows. Got a fire pit? Break out the S’mores supplies! And then, take a deep breath and pat yourself on the back for a job well done.





Why Buy A Lawn Sweeper?

October 9th, 2014

Lawn Sweepers for SaleOwning a lawn sweeper may seem like a guilty pleasure, at least to the young whipper-snappers out there, but it is money well spent and simply priceless in terms of the wear and tear on your body and the time you save on those clean up chores around the yard. With few moveable parts and no motor, a lawn sweeper will last you, literally, for years.

Lawn Sweepers Save Time & Money

You don't walk the area to be mowed first? How many times have you run over a toy or got a wire stuck in the mower blades or flung a rock and counted your blessings because that rock didn’t break a window, or worse? Pushing a lawn sweeper around your property prior to mowing will quickly and effortlessly pick up all those branches, rocks, pieces of metal or ropes, and a myriad of other items that end up on your lawn and can become a deadly, fast-moving projectile or, at the least, wear, chip, dull or become tangled in your mower blades. And you know mower blades are not cheap or easy to replace.

Lawn Sweepers Make It Easy

Do you compost? If so, a lawn sweeper is simply worth its weight in gold. Making quick and easy work of fallen leaves and grass clippings, the time it takes to clean your lawn and add to your compost pile is so greatly reduced you can spend more time lying in your hammock, fishing, playing with the grandkids or otherwise pursuing more enjoyable hobbies or interests. Not only does it save time, composting saves money and is much more earth-friendly, recycling waste that would otherwise be thrown away, making rich, organic fertilizer with which to feed your flower or vegetable gardens. Owning a lawn sweeper will make composting almost as easy as driving to the garden center, but oh-so-much less expensive!

The Truth About Lawn Envy

Lawn sweeper to push in your yardAnd finally, do you drive by that place around the block and wonder how their lawn always looks so clean and gorgeous? Are you envious? Most of us are! The truth is, most people who have such a beautiful, spotless yard either have a lawn service, a gardener or a lawn sweeper! We all know a gardener can be quite expensive, and a lawn service is only a little bit less so. A lawn sweeper, on the other hand, is relatively inexpensive, often
paying for itself in just one use if you employ a lawn service or a gardener. Even if you normally do the yard work yourself; if you paid yourself $10.00 an hour, your lawn sweeper would pay for itself in as little as 10 hours! How many hours a month do you spend on your lawn? How much would it be worth to cut that time in half, or more?

So, we invite you to browse our lawn sweepers. They are all proudly made in the U.S. and come with a one year manufacturer's warranty.

Happy Fall! And here's to your beautiful yard with less work!

Fall Flower Bulb Planting Schedule

September 23rd, 2014

Planting fall flower bulbs is an ideal gardening project for the novice and a never-ending source of joy for the more experienced. Planting is easy and pretty much goof-proof, with the outcome so predictable as to allow you to design flowerbeds that your neighbors will be in awe of. (You might be a little impressed, yourself). So, get out your colored pencils or crayons and start designing. You don't even need to know how to draw! Just sketch the shapes you'd like to see in your yard and experiment with filling them in with small colorful circles (the flowers). There are also numerous websites with planting and design ideas. Click here for some really good information, including the recommended number of bulbs per square foot of landscape. You are welcome to contact our Master Gardener with questions, or visit this page for detailed flower bulb planting information.

The following map is a representation of generally the best time to plant fall bulbs for spring blooms in your area. Order bulbs when you're ready and we will ship them to your doorstep according to the Fall Bulb Planting Schedule.


Keep these things in mind:

  • Bulbs can be stored for a short time in a cool, dry place. However, plant as soon as conditions are right. Bulbs do not store well for the following season.
  • You can begin to plant fall bulbs when the soil temperature drops to 55°F.
  • Bulbs do not like wet feet, even in winter. Plant bulbs in well-draining soil.
  • Bulbs like sunny gardens. Remember though, when fall-planted bulbs bloom, many trees are not putting on leaves yet. Your flower bulbs may grow really well under that birch or aspen.
  • Planting clusters of color, rather than single bulbs and/or single rows, is recommended by professionals.
  • Bulbs prefer to be planted with the pointed side up, but will, if planted wrong, figure it out anyway.
  • You are only limited by your own imagination. Have fun!
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